This page provides information on a number of individuals about whom relatively little is known.

Atom I[edit | edit source]

Atom was Al Pratt,[1] a founding member of the Justice Society of America.[2]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • The Golden Age Atom was Albert Pratt, a pint-sized superhero without powers from Calvin City. He has been associated with the Justice Society of America and the All-Star Squadron.

Black Canary I[edit | edit source]

The original Black Canary, real name Dinah Drake Lance,[3] was born in 1943 and became the mother of Dinah Lance, the current Black Canary, in 1986.[4]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • Dinah Drake Lance was initially introduced as a supporting character of Johnny Thunder and the Thunderbolt. Originally a member of the Justice Society on Earth-Two, she traveled to Earth-One after the death of her husband, where she joined the Justice League and fell in love with Green Arrow. Decades later, it was retconned that Dinah never went to Earth-One, but was trapped in an interdimensional limbo, and the Black Canary fighting in the League was actually her daughter who was infused with her memories.

Brenda[edit | edit source]

Brenda is a friend of Jaime Reyes and Tye Longshadow.[5]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • Brenda Del Vecchio was a good friend of Jaime, and a niece of his adversary Tia Amparo.

Crimson Avenger[edit | edit source]

Crimson Avenger was the first "mystery man" and started his crimefighting career in 1938.[6] He was not associated with the Justice Society of America.[7]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • In the comics, Crimson Avenger, real name Lee Travis, is a Golden Age superhero, who has been associated with the All-Star Squadron and the Seven Soldiers of Victory.

Doctor Mid-Nite[edit | edit source]

Doctor Mid-Nite, real name Charles McNider, was a member of the All-Star Squadron, joining the group upon its formation in December, 1941. When the Squadron disbanded in 1945, he joined the Justice Society of America, where he remained a member until its dissolution in 1951.[8]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • Charles McNider was a blind physician who fought crime as Doctor Mid-Nite.

Doctor Occult[edit | edit source]

Doctor Occult, along with Rose Psychic, was one of the first superheroes, though neither were public figures.[6] He was not associated with the Justice Society of America.[7]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • Some of DC's oldest heroes, Doc and Rose debuted in New Fun Comics, the precursor of More Fun Comics. They were rarely used until the Reign in Hell arc, when Rose died and her spirit co-inhabited Doc's body.

Firebrand I[edit | edit source]

The first Firebrand was Rod Reilly,[1] who used the name sometime prior to 1945,[9] when Danette Reilly, really an android later known as Red Inferno, took up the name.[10]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • In the comics, the first Firebrand was a wealthy socialite named Rod Reilly. He was the brother of the second, Danette.

Guardian I[edit | edit source]

The original Jim Harper was the golden age Guardian, and the great-grandfather of Arsenal. When the current Jim Harper was cloned using genetic material from Roy Harper, he thought he was the grandson of his namesake.[11]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • James Jacob Harper was a cop who became a vigilante to act on things he couldn't touch in uniform. His hometown was originally York City, but that was changed to New York City and later Metropolis. He was an ally of the Newsboy Legion, and a part-time member of the All-Star Squadron.

Hourman[edit | edit source]

Hourman was a founding member of the Justice Society of America.[2]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • Hourman is the name of several superheroes. The Golden Age Hourman was Rex Tyler, who used a drug called Miraclo to provide him with super-powers for exactly one hour.

Joe Chill[edit | edit source]

Joe Chill was the killer of Thomas and Martha Wayne, Bruce Wayne's parents.[12]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • Many different tales surround Joe Chill, the man who shot Thomas and Martha Wayne. Sometimes, he's tried and convicted. Sometimes, he's never caught. Sometimes Batman knew who he was, and sometimes he didn't. And once, Batman actually had to team up with him.

Jor-El[edit | edit source]

Jor-El was a Kryptonian, and the father of Superman. He died when Krypton was destroyed.[13]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • Jor-El and his wife Lara died in the destruction of Krypton.

Kit Freeman[edit | edit source]

Kit Freeman (b. 2000)[14] is one of Billy Batson's best school friends.[15]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • Kit Freeman was planned to appear in a story centred on the Marvel family in the companion comic.[15]
  • In the comics, Christopher "Kit" Freeman is Kid Eternity, a young superhero who could summon the spirits of the dead. Though originally published by Quality Comics, he was later retconned as a brother of Freddy Freeman, a Fawcett Comics character.

Lara[edit | edit source]

Lara was a Kryptonian, and the mother of Superman. She died when Krypton was destroyed.[13]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • Lara Lor-Van and her husband Jor-El died in the destruction of Krypton.

Larry Lance[edit | edit source]

Larry Lance is the father of Dinah Lance.[3]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • Larry Lance was a private investigator, who was killed by the villain Aquarius.

Lieutenant Marvel[edit | edit source]

Lieutenant Marvel, real name Freddy Freeman[16] (b. 2000),[14]is one of Billy Batson's best school friends[15] and a former member of the Team. He joined the Team sometime after 2010, and left prior to 2015. His designation is B14.[17]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • Freddy Freeman was planned to appear in a story centred on the Marvel family in the companion comic.[15]
  • In the comics, Freddy Freeman is Captain Marvel, Jr., best friend of Billy Batson. After being crippled by Captain Nazi, Captain Marvel gave him a fraction of his powers. Unlike Mary Marvel, he does not change by invoking the name of the wizard Shazam; instead, he calls on Captain Marvel.

Martha Kent[edit | edit source]

Martha Kent raised Clark Kent.[18]

Background information[edit | edit source]

Merlyn[edit | edit source]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • Merlyn was planned to appear in a story centred on the Arrow family in the companion comic, which would have included the Earth-16 version of events in the DC Showcase: Green Arrow short written by Greg Weisman.[15]
    • Merlyn was the secondary antagonist in the short; an assassin-for-hire contracted to kill Princess Perdita of Vlatava by her villainous uncle, Count Vertigo. In an unused scene cut for time, Merlyn taught Green Arrow how to shoot arrows.[19]

Miss Arrowette[edit | edit source]

Miss Arrowette was a name briefly used by Cissie King-Jones's mother.[20]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • Bonnie King was a Green Arrow fan. She donned the Miss Arrowette costume and briefly dated him, before being rejected. She forced her own daughter Cissie into becoming a superhero.

Paco[edit | edit source]

Paco is a friend of Jaime Reyes and Tye Longshadow.[5]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • Paco was a good friend of Jaime, a somewhat boorish underachiever who is proud of his Mexican heritage but flunked Spanish. He initially went without a surname, but was given the full name Paco Testas in the 2011 reboot.

Rose Psychic[edit | edit source]

Rose Psychic, along with Doctor Occult, was one of the first superheroes, though neither were public figures.[6] She was not associated with the Justice Society of America.[7]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • Some of DC's oldest heroes, Doc and Rose debuted in New Fun Comics, the precursor of More Fun Comics. They were rarely used until the Reign in Hell arc, when Rose died and her spirit co-inhabited Doc's body.

Sergeant Marvel[edit | edit source]

Sergeant Marvel, real name Mary Bromfield[21] (b. 2000),[14]is one of Billy Batson's best school friends[15] and a former member of the Team.[17] She became a hero some time after July 2010[22] and joined the Team, but left prior to 2015. Her designation is B15.[17]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • Mary Bromfield was planned to appear in a story centred on the Marvel family in the companion comic.[15] She was also planned to appear at Raquel Ervin's bridal shower in "Satisfaction" and the gathering of heroes in "Endgame", but there was not sufficient time to design the character.[23]

Shazam[edit | edit source]

Shazam is an individual with connections to Captain Marvel.[16] Captain Marvel uses the word "Shazam" to transform from Billy Batson to Captain Marvel, and vice versa.[24]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • Shazam was planned to appear in a story centered on the Marvel family in the companion comic.[16]
  • In the comics, Shazam bestowed powers on both Captain Marvel and Black Adam. By speaking his name, Marvel and Adam would be struck by magical lightning, which changed them to their secret identity.
  • The letters of his name were an acronym for the original users of the powers' names. For example, the S gave Captain Marvel the wisdom of Solomon.

Zeus[edit | edit source]

Zeus is a Greek god and supporter of mankind.[25]

Background information[edit | edit source]

  • An early proposal for the Young Justice: Legacy storyline had Zeus as a key villain, with the Team attempting to prevent an ancient and powerful weapon, the Spear of Reckoning (which might have been Zeus's thunderbolt), from falling into enemy hands. While the basic concept was approved, the use of Zeus and a Grecian weapon was rejected as Zeus is a good guy in Earth-16.[citation needed]
  • Zeus was one of the principal gods of Greek mythology, the king of the Olympians. In DC Comics, Zeus and the other gods are worshiped by the Amazons and the Atlanteans. He was also the father of Cassandra Sandsmark. He is also a benefactor of Captain Marvel, and is responsible for the magic lightning whenever the name of Shazam is invoked.

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Weisman, Greg (2020-10-23). Question #22903. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2020-10-23.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Weisman, Greg (2012-02-09). Question #14216. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2013-05-17.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Weisman, Greg (2012-04-30). Question #14709. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2013-05-17.
  4. Weisman, Greg (2010-12-03). Question #12739. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2013-05-17.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Weisman, Greg (2013-10-09). Question #19013. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2013-10-09.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Weisman, Greg (2011-09-16). Question #13499. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2013-05-17.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 Weisman, Greg (2011-11-15). Question #13667. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2013-05-17.
  8. Weisman, Greg (2013-05-15). Question #18608. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2013-05-17.
  9. Weisman, Greg (2012-02-02). Question #14128. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2013-05-17.
  10. Weisman, Greg, Kevin Hopps (w). Jones, Christopher (a). Atkinson, Zac (col). Sienty, Dezi (let). Chadwick, Jim (ed). "Under the Surface..." Young Justice 14 (March 21, 2012), New York, NY: DC Comics
  11. Weisman, Greg (2013-05-16). Question #18622. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2013-05-18.
  12. Weisman, Greg (2011-09-16). Question #13500. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2013-05-17.
  13. 13.0 13.1 Weisman, Greg (2013-04-26). Question #18420. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2013-05-18.
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 Weisman, Greg (2013-01-27). Question #19450. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2014-01-28.
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 15.3 15.4 15.5 15.6 Harvey, James (2013-02-19). Greg Weisman Discusses The Final Issue Of The “Young Justice” Comic Series. World's Finest. Retrieved 2013-05-17.
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 (2013-05-03). The Dynamic Buzz (C2E2 Christopher Jones Interview). YouTube. Retrieved 2013-05-03.
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 Weisman, Greg (2013-03-12). Interview with Greg Weisman. World's Finest. Retrieved 2013-05-17.
  18. Weisman, Greg (2013-09-05). Question #14165. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2012-02-06.
  19. Weisman, Greg (2010-11-10). Question #12637. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2013-05-18.
  20. Weisman, Greg (2013-04-18). Question #18330. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2013-04-19.
  21. Weisman, Greg (2013-10-08). Question #19009. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2013-10-08.
  22. Weisman, Greg (2013-10-14). Question #19929. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2014-10-14.
  23. Weisman, Greg (2013-04-04). ASK GREG LIVE - Correcting the web. Ask Greg. Retrieved 2013-05-17.
  24. Weisman, Greg (writer) & Chang, Michael (director) (March 3, 2012). "Misplaced". Young Justice. Season 1. Episode 19. Cartoon Network.
  25. Scott, Sharon (2012-10-26). Sharon Scott Blog: The Note that Changed Everything. YoungJusticeLegacy.com. Retrieved 2013-05-18.
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